Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, San Francisco
Hong Kong

Two Hong Kong intangible cultural heritage items recognized

 

Two intangible cultural heritage (ICH) items from Hong Kong, the Tin Hau Festival in Hong Kong and the Hong Kong cheongsam making technique, have been successfully inscribed onto the Fifth National List of ICH announced by the State Council earlier.

The two successfully inscribed items are in the categories of "social practices, rituals and festive events" and "traditional craftsmanship" defined by the Convention for the Safeguarding of the ICH promulgated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific & Cultural Organization.

With outstanding historical and cultural value, these two items are representative of their kind. Both items were also inscribed onto the First ICH Inventory of Hong Kong in 2014 and the Representative List of the ICH of Hong Kong in 2017.

Details of the two items are as follows:

(1) Tin Hau Festival in Hong Kong

The Tin Hau belief has a long history in Hong Kong. It is believed that the Tin Hau Temple located in Joss House Bay, Sai Kung, was built in the Southern Song dynasty. Every year, on the 23rd day of the third lunar month, or on other designated dates, the birthday of Tin Hau is celebrated in different scales in various districts. Some local organizations stage Cantonese opera performances to express gratitude to Tin Hau, and organize the fa pau lots drawing ceremony. Some may also hold parades along waterways or on land.

The Tin Hau Festival in Hong Kong has been inscribed onto the Fifth National List of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the People's Republic of China. Photo shows the celebration of the Tin Hau Festival in Leung Shuen Wan, Sai Kung.
The Tin Hau Festival in Hong Kong has been inscribed onto the Fifth National List of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the People's Republic of China. Photo shows the celebration of the Tin Hau Festival in Leung Shuen Wan, Sai Kung.

 

(2) Hong Kong cheongsam making technique

The origin of the cheongsam dates back to decades ago and it became popular during the early Republican period. After World War II, many tailors moved from Shanghai to Hong Kong. As a consequence, the craftsmanship of the Hong Kong cheongsam was enriched and Western sewing skills were taken up, resulting in the uniqueness of the Hong Kong cheongsam making technique. Once everyday attire for Hong Kong women, the elegant dress can these days be seen at special occasions. The men's cheongsam is a symbol of the seniority of clan elders in the New Territories, and carries important social significance. The men's cheongsam was recognized as formal wear for attending important occasions such as the spring and autumn ancestral worship of clans and other large community celebrations including the Jiao Festival.

 

The Hong Kong cheongsam making technique has been inscribed onto the Fifth National List of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the People's Republic of China. Photo shows a cheongsam tailor making a cheongsam meticulously.
The Hong Kong cheongsam making technique has been inscribed onto the Fifth National List of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the People's Republic of China. Photo shows a cheongsam tailor making a cheongsam meticulously.


Other cultural heritage items already inscribed onto the National List of ICH include Cantonese opera, herbal tea, the Cheung Chau Jiao Festival, the Tai O dragon boat water parade, the Tai Hang fire dragon dance, the Yu Lan Festival of the Hong Kong Chiu Chow community, the Hakka unicorn dance in Hang Hau in Sai Kung, the Wong Tai Sin belief and customs, the Quanzhen Temples Taoist ritual music and the arts of the guqin.

The Government will continue its commitment to preserving and promoting local ICH and will also encourage the participation of the community in supporting the transmission and development of Hong Kong's traditional culture.


 

       2021 © | Important notices     Privacy policy      Accessibility                                                                                                                                               Last Revision Date: August 25, 2021

 

Web For All W3C Web Accessibility initiative    
This website adopts web accessibility design and conforms to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Level AA standard. Should you have any enquiries or comments on its accessibility, please contact us by phone or email.